Ramón y Cajal, Santiago

Abstract

1852–1934 Spanish histologist whose work formed the basis of the neuron doctrine: the idea that the brain and spinal cord are made up of individual cells, called neurons, and their supporting cells and blood vessels.

Keywords: neuron doctrine; neurohistology; nervous system; Golgi stain; brain

Figure 1.

Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852–1934). Reproduced from Polyak S (1958) The Vertebrate Visual System. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

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Further Reading

Ramón y Cajal S (1972) The Structure of the Retina, translated by S Thorpe and Glickstein. Springfield: Thomas.

Ramón y Cajal S (1989) Recollections of my Life, translated by E Horne Craigie. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Ramón y Cajal S (1990) New Ideas on the Structure of the Nervous System in Man and Vertebrates, translated by N Swanson and LW Swanson. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Ramón y Cajal S (1991) Cajal's Degeneration and Regeneration of the Nervous System, translated by RM May. New York: Oxford University Press.

Ramón y Cajal S (1995) Histology of the Nervous System of Man and the Vertebrates, translated from the French by N Swanson and LW Swanson. New York: Oxford University Press.

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How to Cite close
Glickstein, Mitchell(May 2001) Ramón y Cajal, Santiago. In: eLS. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester. http://www.els.net [doi: 10.1038/npg.els.0002381]