Reprogenetics: Visions of the Future

Abstract

As humans acquire the capacity to modify their germ‐line DNA for purposes of enhancement, one can imagine a variety of different scenarios for the future. Some of these possible futures may have an important social context and an influence on how genetic enhancements may be socially valued.

Keywords: inheritable germ‐line modification; reproduction; society; scenario; enhancement; behavioral genetics; commercialism

References

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Further Reading

Billings P, Hubbard R and Newman SA (1999) Human germ‐line gene modification: a dissent. Lancet 353: 1873–1875.

Buchanan A, Brock DW, Daniels N and Wikler D (2000) From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Haker H and Beyleveld D (eds.) (2000) The Ethics of Genetics in Human Procreation. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate.

Kitcher P (1996) The Lives to Come: The Genetic Revolution and Human Possibilities. London, UK: Penguin Books.

Parens E (ed.) (1998) Enhancing Human Traits: Ethical and Social Implications. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.

Shapiro MH (2000) Human enhancement uses of biotechnology, policy, technological enhancement and human equality. In: Murray TH and Mehlman MJ (eds.) Encyclopaedia of Ethical, Legal and Policy Issues in Biotechnology. vol. 1, pp. 527–548. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons.

Stock G and Campbell J (eds.) (2000) Engineering the Human Germ Line: An Exploration of the Science and Ethics of Altering the Genes We Pass to Our Children. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Walters LR and Palmer JG (1997) The Ethics of Human Gene Therapy. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Web Links

Frankel MS and Chapman AR (2000) Human inheritable genetic modifications: assessing scientific, ethical, religious, and policy issues. Prepared by the American Association for the Advancement of Science http://www.aaas.org/spp/dspp/sfrl/germ line/main.htm

Nuffield Council of Bioethics (2002) Genetics and human behaviour: the ethical context. Published by the Nuffield Council of Bioethics, London http://www.nuffieldbioethics.org

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How to Cite close
Kollek, Regine(Jul 2006) Reprogenetics: Visions of the Future. In: eLS. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester. http://www.els.net [doi: 10.1038/npg.els.0005221]