Electroencephalogram (EEG) and Evoked Potentials

Abstract

Analysis of the basic properties of brain waves and evoked potentials allows one to decompose the information contained in the electroencephalogram into a genetically determined static component and a dynamic component that reflect interactions with and reactions to the immediate environment. This approach is useful for the definition of endophenotypes and for studying the dynamic properties of brain waves.

Keywords: brain waves; spectral patterns; heritability; phenotype classes; pathological developments

Figure 1.

Electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral pattern of the same person for repeated assessments at 5‐year intervals. (a) First assessment; (b) second assessment 5 years later. The variability of spectral intensities is plotted as a shaded area on log‐proportional scales along the vertical axes. The spectral resolution is 0.25 Hz over the frequency range 0–30 Hz, and the experimental condition is quiet wakefulness (channel P3–O1).

Figure 2.

(a) Electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral patterns derived from a pair of monozygotic twins. (b) electroencephalogram spectral patterns derived from a pair of monozygotic twins. In comparison with (a) it is worth noting that the similarity between co‐twins is striking while the between‐pair differences are such that a computerized recognition of persons is possible at high reliability. In each figure the variability of spectral intensities is plotted as the shaded area on log‐proportional scales along the vertical axes. The spectral resolution is 0.25 Hz over the frequency range 0–30 Hz, and the experimental condition is quiet wakefulness (channel P3–O1).

Figure 3.

Electroencephalogram spectral patterns derived from a pair of dizygotic twins. It is worth noting that dizygotic co‐twins can be as dissimilar from each other as unrelated individuals are. The variability of spectral intensities is plotted as the shaded area on log‐proportional scales along the vertical axes. The spectral resolution is 0.25 Hz over the frequency range 0–30 Hz, and the experimental condition is quiet wakefulness (channel P3–O1).

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Further Reading

Alvarez‐Amador A, Valdes‐Sosa PA, Pascual‐Marqui RD, et al. (1989) On the structure of EEG development. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 73: 10–19.

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Meshkova TA (1992) Laterality effects in twins. Acta Geneticae Medicae et Gemellologiae 41: 325–333.

Plomin R, Emde RN, Braungart JM, et al. (1994) Genetic change and continuity from fourteen to twenty months: the MacArthur Longitudinal Twin Study. Child Development 64: 1354–1376.

Williams JT, Begleiter H, Porjesz B, et al. (1999) Joint multipoint linkage analysis of multivariate qualitative and quantitative traits. II. Alcoholism and event‐related potentials. American Journal of Human Genetics 65(4): 1148–1160.

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How to Cite close
Stassen, Hans H(Jul 2006) Electroencephalogram (EEG) and Evoked Potentials. In: eLS. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester. http://www.els.net [doi: 10.1038/npg.els.0005236]