Epidemiological Tools

Abstract

Epidemiological studies are useful for investigating the prevalence of genetic traits, gene–disease associations, and gene–gene and gene–environment interactions. Epidemiological tools are used to select study samples, estimate risk and evaluate associations.

Keywords: epidemiology; disease; prevalence; association; interaction

References

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Further Reading

Ellsworth DL and Manolio TA (1999) The emerging importance of genetics in epidemiologic research. I. Basic concepts in human genetics and laboratory technology. Annals of Epidemiology 9: 1–16.

Ellsworth DL and Manolio TA (1999) The emerging importance of genetics in epidemiologic research. II. Issues in study design and gene mapping. Annals of Epidemiology 9: 75–90.

Ellsworth DL and Manolio TA (1999) The emerging importance of genetics in epidemiologic research. III. Bioinformatics and statistical genetic methods. Annals of Epidemiology 9: 207–224.

Goldstein AM and Andrieu N (1999) Detection of interaction involving identified genes: available study designs. Monographs of the National Cancer Institute 26: 49–54.

Khoury MJ and Dorman JS (1998) The human genome epidemiology network. American Journal of Epidemiology 148: 1–3.

Khoury MJ and Little J (2000) Human genome epidemiologic reviews: the beginning of something HuGE. American Journal of Epidemiology 151: 2–3.

Last JM (ed.) (1988) A Dictionary of Epidemiology New York: Oxford University Press.

Rothman KJ and Greenland S (1998) Modern Epidemiology Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Schlesselman JJ (1982) Case–Control Studies: Design, Conduct, Analysis. New York: Oxford University Press.

Web Links

The National Human Genome Research Institute. Promoting Safe and Effective Genetic Testing in the United States. Final Report of the Task Force on Genetic Testing http://www.nhgri.nih.gov/ELSI/TFGT_final/

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How to Cite close
Gwinn, Marta, and Khoury, Muin J(Jan 2006) Epidemiological Tools. In: eLS. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester. http://www.els.net [doi: 10.1038/npg.els.0005432]