Yeast as a Model for Human Diseases

Abstract

Yeasts are single‐celled eukaryotes that provide a genetically and biochemically amenable model system for biomedical research. Over the past decades, studies in yeast have established a foundation for much of our current knowledge on such fundamental processes as eukaryotic cell cycle control, genetic instability and colon cancer, metabolism and metabolic disease and even aging. Through basic science and pharmaceutical applications, studies in yeast hold promise for even greater contributions in the future.

Keywords: yeast; saccharomyces cerevisiae; human genetics; model systems; mutations

References

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Further Reading

Adams A, Gottschling DE, Kaiser CA and Stearns T (1997) Methods in Yeast Genetics. Plainview, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

Broach JR, Pringle JR and Jones EW (1991) The Molecular and Cellular Biology of the Yeast Saccharomyces, vol. 1, Genome Dynamics, Protein Synthesis and Energetics Plainview, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

Jones EW, Pringle JR and Broach JR (1992) The Molecular and Cellular Biology of the Yeast Saccharomyces, vol. 2, Gene Expression Plainview, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

Pringle JR, Broach JR and Jones EW (1997) The Molecular and Cellular Biology of the Yeast Saccharomyces, vol. 3, Cell Cycle and Cell Biology Plainview, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

Web Links

Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). This is a scientific database of the molecular biology and genetics of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae http://genome‐www.stanford.edu/Saccharomyces/

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute: the S. pombe Genome Project. A useful resource for S. pombe genome project data as well as other tools and links http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Projects/S_pombe/

mutL homolog 1, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 2 (E. coli) (MLH1). A resource for molecular biology and clinical information concerning MLH1; Locus ID: 4292. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?l=4292

mutS homolog 2, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 1 (E. coli) (MSH2). A resource for molecular biology and clinical information concerning MSH2; Locus ID: 4436. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?l=4436

Werner syndrome (WRN); A resource for molecular biology and clinical information concerning WRN; Locus ID: 7486. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?l=7486

mutL homolog 1, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 2 (E. coli) (MLH1). Information on hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC type 2); MIM number: 120436. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?120436

mutS homolog 2, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 1 (E. coli) (MSH2). Information on hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC type 1); MIM number: 120435. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?120435

Werner syndrome (WRN). Information on the WRN gene and encoded gene product; MIM number: 604611. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?604611

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How to Cite close
Fridovich‐Keil, Judith L(Jan 2006) Yeast as a Model for Human Diseases. In: eLS. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester. http://www.els.net [doi: 10.1038/npg.els.0005581]