Bladder Cancer

Abstract

Cancer of the urinary bladder is a very common disease. It is often characterized by frequent recurrences of superficial tumors during several years.

Keywords: bladder; transitional cell carcinoma; chromosome 9; gene expression; molecular classification

Figure 1.

A model of gene expression events during the progression of bladder cancer. The top of the figure shows the stages of bladder cancer, and the lower part shows the sequence of transcriptional events. The arrows indicate reduced or increased gene expression. The figure is based on cluster analysis of microarray data, and combines the different cluster methods.

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References

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Further Reading

Cappellen D, De Oliveira C, Ricol D, et al. (1999) Frequent activating mutations of FGFR3 in human bladder and cervix carcinomas. Nature Genetics 23(1): 18–20.

Cordon‐Cardo C (1998) Molecular alterations in bladder cancer. Cancer Survey 32: 115–131. Review.

Liang G, Gonzales FA, Jones PA, Orntoft TF and Thykjaer T (2002) Analysis of gene induction in human fibroblasts and bladder cancer cells exposed to the methylation inhibitor 5‐aza‐2′‐deoxycytidine. Cancer Research 62(4): 961–966.

Primdahl H, von der Maase H, Christensen M, Wolf H and Orntoft TF (2000) Allelic deletions of cell growth regulators during progression of bladder cancer. Cancer Research 60(23): 6623–6629.

Rabbani F, Richon VM, Orlow I, et al. (1999) Prognostic significance of transcription factor E2F‐1 in bladder cancer: genotypic and phenotypic characterization. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 91(10): 874–881.

van Rhijn BW, Lurkin I, Radvanyi F, et al. (2001) The fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutation is a strong indicator of superficial bladder cancer with low recurrence rate. Cancer Research 61(4): 1265–1268.

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Web Links

Danish Centre for Human Genome Research. Human 2D‐PAGE databases for proteome analysis in health and disease http://proteomics.cancer.dk

Cyclin‐dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (melanoma, p16, inhibits CDK4) (CDKN2A); Locus ID: 1029. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?l=1029

Glutathione S‐transferase M1 (GSTM1); Locus ID: 2944. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?1=2944

met proto‐oncogene (hepatocyte growth factor receptor) (MET); Locus ID: 4233. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?1=4233

Tumor suppressor gene tumor protein p53 (Li–Fraumeni syndrome) (TP53); Locus ID: 7157. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?1=7157

v‐myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog 1, lung carcinoma derived (avian) (MYCL1); Locus ID: 4610. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?1=4610

Cyclin‐dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (melanoma, p16, inhibits CDK4) (CDKN2A); MIM number: 600160. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?600160

Glutathione S‐transferase M1 (GSTM1); MIM number: 138350. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?138350

met proto‐oncogene (hepatocyte growth factor receptor) (MET); MIM number: 164860. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?164860

Tumor suppressor gene tumor protein p53 (Li–Fraumeni syndrome) (TP53); MIM number: 191170. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?191170

v‐myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog 1, lung carcinoma derived (avian) (MYCL1); MIM number: 164850. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?164850

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How to Cite close
Orntoft, Torben F(Jan 2006) Bladder Cancer. In: eLS. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester. http://www.els.net [doi: 10.1038/npg.els.0006055]