Mutation Rate: Sex Biases

Abstract

At least in humans, more spontaneous point mutations occur in the male germ line than in the female germ line. One explanation for this is the greater number of germ‐cell divisions in males than in females.

Keywords: point mutations; germ‐cell divisions; sex chromosomes; methylation; neutral evolution; dominance

References

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Further Reading

Ebersberger I, Metzler D, Schwarz C and Paabo S (2002) Genomewide comparison of DNA sequences between humans and chimpanzees. American Journal of Human Genetics 70, 1490–1497.

Li WH, Yi S and Makova K (2002) Male‐driven evolution. Current Opinion in Genetics and Development 12, 650–656.

Shimmin LC, Chang BH and Li W‐H (1993) Male‐driven evolution of DNA sequences. Nature 362: 745–747.

Tiemann‐Boege I, Navidi W, Grewal R, et al. (2002) The observed human sperm mutation frequency cannot explain the achondroplasia paternal age effect. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 99, 14952–14957.

Web Links

Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (bacteria‐expressed kinase, keratinocyte growth factor receptor, craniofacial dysostosis 1, Crouzon syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson–Weiss syndrome) (FGFR2); Locus ID: 2263. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?l=2263

Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (achondroplasia, thanatophoric dwarfism) (FGFR3); Locus ID: 2261. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?l=2261

Neurofibromin 2 (bilateral acoustic neuroma) (NF2); Locus ID: 4771. LocusLink: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/LocusLink/LocRpt.cgi?l=4771

Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (bacteria‐expressed kinase, keratinocyte growth factor receptor, craniofacial dysostosis 1, Crouzon syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson–Weiss syndrome) (FGFR2); MIM number: 176943. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?176943

Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (achondroplasia, thanatophoric dwarfism) (FGFR3); MIM number: 134934. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?134934

Neurofibromin 2 (bilateral acoustic neuroma) (NF2); MIM number: 101000. OMIM: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin‐post/Omim/dispmim?101000

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How to Cite close
Hurst, Laurence D(Jan 2006) Mutation Rate: Sex Biases. In: eLS. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester. http://www.els.net [doi: 10.1038/npg.els.0006093]